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Carbon County Newspapers

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1904

Winter Quarters and Clear Creek mines to increase to four days per week. Sunnyside had never been lower than six days per week. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, June 11, 1904, p.2)

1905

"NEW COAL COMPANY FILES ITS ARTICLES - Another coal company has sprung into existence. It is the Western Coal and Coke company, which is the owner of several tracts of coal land in Carbon County, near Helper, says the Salt Lake Telegram of last Tuesday (May 2, 1905). The surveys of the company's lands have been finished and work is expected to commence at an early date. Besides the general marketing of coal the company will construct a large number of coke ovens.

"The company has filed articles of incorporation. The capital stock is placed at $500,000, divided into 500,000 shares.

"The following officers were chosen: President, Joseph A. Brown, vice president, J. W. Sterling, secretary, Arthur A. Sweet, treasurer, R. J. Evans." (Eastern Utah Advocate, May 4, 1905)

"WESTERN COAL AND COKE COMPANY IN LAW SUIT - Messrs. B. R. McDonald, W. H. Lawley, James Wade, Frank Branch and Chub Milburn are in Salt Lake City having been subpoenaed as witnesses in a contest between the Western Coal and Coke company and B. R. McDonald. It appears that Wade and Lawley have taken up one half of Section 9 and all of Section 4, as mineral lands. Mr. McDonald claims there is no mineral there and has filed upon the same land for grazing purposes. The case is being heard at the land office in Salt Lake City and will be finished this week.

"The promoters of the company hope to locate a number of coke ovens in the vicinity of Price. Joseph S. Brown, a millionaire banker of Ohio, is president of the company." (Eastern Utah Advocate, May 4, 1905)

The Aberdeen mine property owned by Wade, Sweet, Lawley is "likely to open soon". (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, October 12, 1905, p.3, "Opening of Coal Mines Above Price")

1906

New road to start at either Salina or Marysvale, cross the San Pedro near Milford, then strike west to Pioche. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, September 6, 1906, p.1, "Gould To Build South Of Price")

Senator Clark has purchased the San Pete Valley Railroad and already has valuable coal holdings. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, October 11, 1906, p.6, "Clark After Emery Coal")

Salt Lake, Garfield and Western Railway takes option on San Pete Valley to enter coal fields beyond Sterling. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, November 1, 1906, p.1, "May Penetrate Emery County")

Independent Coal and Coke took over the Aberdeen mine formerly worked by Wade-Lawley. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, December 27, 1906, p.5, "Aberdeen Mine Sold")

1907

The Union Pacific mine at Scofield was to be re-opened to supply coal to the Oregon Short Line Railroad. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, February 28, 1907, p.1)

The Union Pacific mine was to be re-opened after being idle for ten years. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, March 7, 1907, p.6)

The Mud Creek mine, called the Utah mine, was first opened "twenty years ago" (in 1887), but never developed. Utah Fuel to re-open the Utah mine. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, April 25, 1907, p.6)

The U. S. government filed suit against Utah Fuel, Morton Trust, and Pleasant Valley Coal concerning coal land fraud. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, May 23, 1907, p.6)

Syndicate of eastern and Utah capitalists purchase San Pete Valley Railroad, Sterling Coal and Coke Company, and Mount Nebo Stone Company for "a million dollars." (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, June 6, 1907, p.1, "Buys Out Railroad")

Rails and ties to the Union Pacific mine were being laid to the mine. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, June 6, 1907, p.7)

Early press reports misnamed the Southern Utah Railroad, calling it the Utah Southern Railroad. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, June 6, 1907; June 13, 1907, p.6; June 20, 1907, p.5)

The Union Pacific mine was formerly called the Mud Creek mine, now called the Utah mine. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, June 20, 1907, p.7)

Article about start-up of Independent Coal and Coke. Tracks for railroad now in, using a D&RG engine until the "Shea" arrives. (Eastern Utah Advocate, August 15, 1907, "New Cable Now Going In")

Article about Carbon County mines. (Eastern Utah Advocate, August 22, 1907)

Article about foreclosure of mortgage on Rio Grande's Bingham Branch. (Eastern Utah Advocate, August 22, 1907, p.5)

Announcement of incorporation of Southern Utah Railroad. (Eastern Utah Advocate, September 5, 1907, p.3)

Union Pacific Coal Company at Clear Creek. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, September 5, 1907, p.3)

Coal was first mined in Gordon Creek Canyon by W. C. Brooker and five others on 1,000 acres of the Sheya Ranch. Two coal veins of seven feet thickness each showed at the surface. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, September 19, 1907, p.3)

San Pete Valley sold to Rio Grande Western on September 16, 1907, along with Sterling Coal and Coke Company and the Mount Nebo quarries. Since the railroad was constructed "fifteen years ago", almost owned exclusively by Charles Morrison of London, who is 94 years old. (Eastern Utah Advocate, October 3, 1907, p.1, "Western Takes San Pete Valley")(Noted in San Pete area outline, 12/19/82)

The Utah mine was producing fifty tons per day. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, October 3, 1907, p.3)

The coke ovens at Castle Gate were closed. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, October 3, 1907, p.3)

Consolidated Fuel Company incorporated, to own 1,700 acres of coal lands. (Eastern Utah Advocate, October 24, 1907, p.1, "Miller Creek Section Soon To Be Developed")

Independent Coal and Coke has leased the Aberdeen mine to an operator. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, November 14, 1907, p.1)

The Aberdeen mine property was leased to C. N. Sweet of Salt Lake City. The mine shipped fifty cars loads during mid November 1907. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, November 21, 1907, p.5)

1908

Utah Fuel Company forced all workers to live in Winter Quarters. Some were living in Scofield. Those not moved by January 31, 1908 were told to "get their time and settle up." Scofield and Winter Quarters mines were working three days a week, the Union Pacific mine was working four to five days a week. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, January 30, 1908, p.6)

Southern Utah Railroad was to build from Price rather than Helper if Price puts up approximately $8,500.00. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, March 12, 1908, p.1, "Is Now Up To The People Of Price")

Kenilworth producing about 300 tons per day. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, March 12, 1908, p.3)

Clear Creek and Winter Quarters mines producing about 2,000 tons daily, working three days per week. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, March 26, 1908, p.8)

Union Pacific mine producing 400 tons per day. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, March 26, 1908, p.8)

David J. Sharp sold coal property adjoining the Independent property to United States Smelting, Refining and Mining. A tramway was to be built and the mines producing by June 1908. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, April 23, 1908, p.1)

New railroad from Lund, on the Salt Lake Route, to Cedar City, a distance of thirty five miles. Construction to start in ten days, by late May. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, May 21, 1908, p.8, "New Railroad For Harmony Coalfields")

Union Pacific mine shipping 1,200 tons daily. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, June 11, 1908, p.1)

Kenilworth producing 600 tons per day and cannot keep up with the demand. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, September 24, 1908, p.3)

Work progressing on the re-opening of the Union Pacific mine after fire. Mine opening has been cleared and re-timbered. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, October 22, 1908, p.1)

In early November 1908, the first seven miles of grading of Southern Utah Railroad was being done by Ely Construction Company for $25,000.00. There were three parties of engineers out on line locating survey. The projected route beyond the first seven miles from the mine was not known, but the best option was towards Price. (Eastern Utah Advocate, November 5, 1908, "Down To Actual Work Of Grading Southern Utah Towards Price") (copied on 11/8/82)

In mid November 1908, 150 men and eighty-five teams working on grading of Southern Utah Railroad from the mines towards Price. The contract for grading the remaining eight miles into Price has not yet been let. (Eastern Utah Advocate, November 19, 1908, "Looks Like Road Is Coming Here")

During late November 1908, the rails for the mine trackage had arrived. The line between the mine and Price was still being graded. The grading contract was only for the seven miles north and east from the mine. The contract for the northern seven miles had not been let. (Eastern Utah Advocate, November 26, 1908, p.1, "Southern Utah Is Making progress) (copied)

In December 1908, the largest coal entries up to that time were made at the U. S. Land Office by Charles Croft, John Heiner, Arthur Tribe, and Charles Heiner, at Miller Creek. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, December 10, 1908, p.1)

Announcement of grading for the Southern Utah Railroad into Price to be done by Ely Construction Company, says C. L. Crandall, president of Ely. Arthur A. Sweet was general manager of Southern Utah Railroad. (Eastern Utah Advocate, December 10, 1908, p.1, "Southern Utah Comes To This Man's Town")

Southern Utah Railroad to be completed by March 1, 1909, rather than January 1, 1909 as previously announced. (Eastern Utah Advocate, December 17, 1908, p.1, "Southern Utah Goes South")

Mays, Orem & Company using teams to haul coal to Price, and may build a railroad next year to connect with the Southern Utah Railroad. (Eastern Utah Advocate, December 17, 1908, p.8, "Cedar Creek Coal Is Going To Zion")

Description of Southern Utah right of way into Price. (Eastern Utah Advocate, December 31, 1908, p.1, "Right Of Way For Southern Utah Road") (copied)

1909

Sunnyside working six days per week, with 480 coke ovens operating. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, January 28, 1909, p.5)

Kenilworth producing about 700 tons per day. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, February 4, 1909, p.1)

Shay Locomotive of Kenilworth and Helper used to haul water to camp at night and haul coal to Spring Glen during day. A second Shay had been ordered. (Eastern Utah Advocate, February 4, 1909, p.1, "Kenilworth Has Big Output")

Grading work on the Southern Utah had progressed to a point about eight miles from the mines to Price. Work was being delayed due to the ground freezing, with most of the livestock being pastured at Huntington. The completion of the grade into Price was to be completed by March 1910. Route of Southern Utah from Price River into Price had been surveyed and staked. (Eastern Utah Advocate, February 4, 1909, p.1, "Bad Weather Delaying Work") (copied 11/8/82)

Forty Greeks were working in a cut on Southern Utah eight miles north and east of the mine, all other work had been halted. (Eastern Utah Advocate, February 11, 1909, p.1, "Storm Hits This Section Sunday")

Southern Utah had bought 56-pound rail for twenty-one miles of railroad from a firm in Chicago. A deal for two locomotives was "practically closed", one was to be a "Shea". Work on grading had been halted due to weather, but was to be complete by summer. (Eastern Utah Advocate, February 18, 1909, p.1, "Southern Utah Purchases Iron")

Clear Creek and Winter Quarters mines producing 1,800 tons per day. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, April 15, 1909, p.1)

Union Pacific mine producing about 1,000 tons per day. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, April 15, 1909, p.1)

"Trains Soon To Whistle Out Of Here" (Eastern Utah Advocate, April 15, 1909, p.1)

All construction materials, including ties and rails, for the completion of the Southern Utah had been ordered. The railroad had also purchased an eighty ton consolidated direct connected locomotive, which was under construction at the factory, to be delivered within seventy-five days. The railroad had also purchased a "gasoline passenger car". A pile driver was being built for the construction of the needed bridges. Bridge construction was to begin in early May 1909. Switch stands, frogs, and turnouts, along with handcars, pushcars, and railcars, were to arrive in Price "this week". Construction of a depot in Price was to begin "in a week or ten days". Ties were being placed in Price in preparation for the rail connection with D&RG. Rails, frogs, and other materials were "arriving today". (Eastern Utah Advocate, April 29, 1909, p.1, "Engine And Materials For Southern Coming") (copied 10/18/82)

The connection with D&RG at Price was completed in "the last few days", and within a week the rails were to reach the Price River bridge. Eight bridges were to be built between Price and Miller Creek. The contract for the construction of the depot had been let. (Eastern Utah Advocate, May 13, 1909, p.1, "Work On New Road Progresses") (copied 10/18/82)

Elevation drawing of new Southern Utah depot in Price. (Eastern Utah Advocate, May 20, 1909, p.1) (copied 10/18/82)

The bridge over the Price River was almost complete, and the pile driver had been moved about a mile south, to Drunkard's Wash to begin work on the railroad's second bridge. Several cars of rails, switches and ties had arrived "during the week". Ties were being cut from the left hand fork of Miller Creek, but work had been stopped by the government, and the ties and materials confiscated by the U. S. Marshall. The tie contractors might have had to move their operations to Cedar Creek Canyon. (Eastern Utah Advocate, June 3, 1909, p.1, "Southern Utah Work Goes On") (copied 10/18/82)

"A Locomotive Now On Its Way" (Eastern Utah Advocate, June 10, 1909, p.1)

F. A. Sweet, of Southern Utah and Consolidated Fuel, was in an automobile accident in City Creek Canyon in Salt Lake City. (Eastern Utah Advocate, July 8, 1909, p.1)

Announcement of Castle Valley Railroad's joint operation of Southern Utah Railroad. Castle Valley Railroad was to have its own yards and terminal in Price. Millionaire J. G. Berryhill of Des Moines, Iowa was said to be "back of the Castle Valley railroad and coal propositions". The Castle Valley Railroad was to be about ten miles long, to reach the Cedar Creek coal deposits, which were said to be the largest and best in Utah. (Eastern Utah Advocate, July 22, 1909, p.1, "Big Railroad And Coal Mining Deal Is Sure Go") (copied 10/18/82)

(Incomplete) Southern Utah leased D&RG locomotive number 503. Its own locomotive had been delayed by a backlog at the builder. F. A. Sweet had been "back east" where he had purchased all machinery and equipment for the Miller Creek mine of Consolidated Fuel Company. Everything was to electrical, and the best coal mine machinery in Utah. The bridge over the Price River had been strengthened following a recent flood. (Eastern Utah Advocate, July 29, 1909, p.1, "Southern Utah Pushing Along") (copied 11/8/82) (OTHER INFORMATION: D&RG 503 was a Rome 4-6-0 built in 1890, construction serial number 568)

Castle Valley Coal Company purchased the Monson ranch above Huntington, where a townsite was to be located. The ranch was needed mainly for its water rights. A party of surveyors from Salt Lake City left Price "last Sunday" (July 25, 1909) for the Cedar Creek country. The board of directors of the Castle Valley Coal Company include A. J. Orem, J. H. Mays, Heber M. Wells, J. R. Berryhill, Willard Hansen, and Moroni Heiner. Work on the railroad was to begin as soon as the incorporation of the coal and railroad companies had been "perfected". (Eastern Utah Advocate, July 29, 1909, "Surveyors Now At Cedar Creek") (copied 10/18/82)

Southern Utah had laid about five miles of track, "beyond the Irrigated Lands company canal", with about a half mile of track to be laid every day. About fifty cars of materials were being unloaded at Price, with more arriving daily. The depot at Price had been completed and was in use as company headquarters. Production from the Miller Creek mine was to begin in early November 1909. (Eastern Utah Advocate, August 5, 1909, p.1, "Southern Utah Is Now Making Half Mile Or More A Day") (copied 11/8/82)

A. E. Welby died on August 8, 1909. (Eastern Utah Advocate, August 12, 1909, p.1)

Southern Utah's bridge over the Price River was washed out on Saturday afternoon, August 7, 1909. (Eastern Utah Advocate, August 12, 1909, "Southern Utah Bridge Goes Out")

Article about Castle Valley Coal Company. Castle Valley Railroad is building its own line. (Eastern Utah Advocate, August 12, 1909, p.1, "New Company To Produce Coal")

"Mechanics And Teams Wanted". (Eastern Utah Advocate, August 19, 1909, p.1)

Castle Valley Railroad survey had been completed. Castle Valley Coal Company and Castle Valley Railroad "practically the same thing. (Eastern Utah Advocate, August 26, 1909, p.5, "Berryhill Interests Already Doing Things")

Both Southern Utah and D&RG suffer damage from floods on Tuesday August 31, 1909. (Eastern Utah Advocate, September 2, 1909, p.1)

"Eleven Miles Of Iron Is Now laid" (Eastern Utah Advocate, September 23, 1909, p.1)

During early October 1909 the Castle Valley Railroad began construction of its new line. The grading work was contracted to the Ely Construction Company of Springville, managed by C. L. Crandall, with work beginning on October 4th, just as the Ely company was finishing the grading to the adjoining Southern Utah railroad. The first phase of grading kept twenty-five teams busy, with wages for teams being five dollars for nine hours of work. Laborers received two and two and quarter dollars per day. If "Americans" were not available, foreigners would be hired. Work was being rushed to complete the grading before the ground froze. The site for the coal company's tipple and new townsite was selected in late September 1909 by James G. Berryhill, of Des Moines, a director of the coal company who was on site at the time, along with J. K. Seifert, a consulting engineer from Chicago. The original name of the townsite was to be Connellsville, after the noted town in Pennsylvania. The original name of the railroad was the Utah and Southwestern. (Eastern Utah Advocate, October 7, 1909, "Cedar Creek Railroad Graders Are Working") (copied 11/8/82)

Ties for the connection of the Castle Valley Railroad to the Southern Utah at Castle Junction were laid on October 13, 1909, "yesterday". (Eastern Utah Advocate, October 14, 1909, p.1, "Twenty Miles Of Rails Are Down") (copied 11/8/82)

Southern Utah Railroad was completed and connection was made with the coal mine's tramway. Some surfacing still needed to be done. Southern Utah number 100, an eight-wheeler, arrived "yesterday morning (October 20, 1909). (Eastern Utah Advocate, October 21, 1909, p.1, "Southern Utah Engine Arrives)

The bridge for the Southern Utah to cross Miller Creek at the mouth of Miller Creek canyon was still not complete. The connection with the two mile tramway of Consolidated Fuel Company was complete. (Eastern Utah Advocate, October 28, 1909, p.1, "Order Placed For New Engine") (copied 11/8/82)

Two miles of the Castle Valley Railroad had been graded, and the ties were to be laid soon. (Eastern Utah Advocate, October 28, 1909, p.1, "Order Placed For New Engine") (copied 11/8/82)

Two miles of Castle Valley Railroad grade completed. (Eastern Utah Advocate, November 25, 1909, p.1, "Pushing Work On New Road") (copied 11/8/82)

1910

Castle Valley Railroad locomotive number 1 arrived. (Eastern Utah Advocate, January 6, 1910, p.1, "Castle Valley's Engine Is Here") (copied 11/8/82)

"First Coal Out Of Hiawatha" (Eastern Utah Advocate, January 13, 1910, p.10)

Castle Valley rails had been laid about half way. (Eastern Utah Advocate, February 17, 1910, p.1, "More Laborers To Cedar Creek")

Southern Utah was shipping about ten cars of coal per day. (Eastern Utah Advocate, February 17, 1910, p.1, "More Laborers To Cedar Creek")

Photo of Sunnyside. (Eastern Utah Advocate, February 17, 1910, p.7)

Castle Valley Railroad completed to Mohrland. First train of coal out of Mohrland on February 27, 1910. (Eastern Utah Advocate, March 17, 1910, p.1, "Castle Valley Is Well")

Article about Southern Utah and Castle Valley railroads, from "Locomotive World" of Lima, Ohio, with photos, including photo of Southern Utah number 100. (Eastern Utah Advocate, March 24, 1910, p.3) (copied entire page, 3/4 of page on 10/18/82 and 1/4 of page on 11/8/82) (Full text of article included in Carbon County narrative history, 12/2/94)

Southern Utah began shipping coal on January 1, 1910. (Eastern Utah Advocate, March 24, 1910, p.3) (copied, see above)

Castle Valley Railroad's locomotive was a near duplicate of Southern Utah's locomotive number 100. (Eastern Utah Advocate, March 24, 1910, p.3) (copied, see above)

Southern Utah's new Shay locomotive arrived at Price on Monday evening, April 4, 1910. The new locomotive was taken out on the line on April 6, 1910, "yesterday". (Eastern Utah Advocate, April 7, 1910, p.1, "The New Sheya Engine Arrives")

4,600 corporations in Utah ceased to legally exist on April 3, 1910. (Eastern Utah Advocate, April 7, 1910, p.8, "Corporations Now Delinquent")

Ely Construction Company placed a lien against Castle Valley Railroad in the amount of $9,280.17. (Eastern Utah Advocate, April 28, 1910, p.5)

Passenger service to Hiawatha and Mohrland was to be started in thirty to forty-five days. A smaller locomotive was to be ordered. (Eastern Utah Advocate, May 19, 1910, p.1)

(COMMENT FROM ACCUMULATED READING: The combined Southern Utah and Castle Valley railroads, along with the D&RG, ran special excursion trains on Sundays for baseball teams and the fans to and from Price and the coal camps.)

Southern Utah's new Shay cost $10,800.00. The bill of sale was "filed this week". (Eastern Utah Advocate, May 26, 1910, p.5)

Consolidated Fuel Company at Hiawatha was producing 800 tons of coal per day. (Eastern Utah Advocate, June 9, 1910, p.3, "One Of Country's Great Coal Mines")

Castle Valley Railroad received an old Bamberger coach on Sunday, June 5, 1910, in very bad condition, "looks like it crossed the plains with the handcart brigades". (Eastern Utah Advocate, June 9, 1910, p.5)

Southern Utah filed suit against B. M. McDonald to condemn land needed for its right of way. (Eastern Utah Advocate, June 23, 1910, p.1)

D&RG depot in Price burned to the ground on June 22, 1910. (Eastern Utah Advocate, June 23, 1910, p.1)

Castle Valley Railroad running a mixed train in and out of Price every other day. Castle Valley paid Bamberger $2,000.00 worth of coal as payment for the passenger car. (Eastern Utah Advocate, June 23, 1910, p.5)

A. A. Sweet died in Long Beach, California on July 20, 1910. (Eastern Utah Advocate, July 21 or 28, 1910)

Southern Utah ordered a third locomotive. (Eastern Utah Advocate, August 4, 1910, p.3)

F. A. Sweet accompanied Harry Shipler "last Sunday", August 7, 1910, to take twenty-five different "views" of Consolidated Fuel facilities. (Eastern Utah Advocate, August 11, 1910, p.5)

D&RG began using its new Salt Lake City depot "last Saturday night" (August 20, 1910). The last train to use the old depot was No. 3, and the first train to use the new depot was the San Pete Local. (Eastern Utah Advocate, August 25, 1910, "Passing Of Salt Lake's Old Depot")

Kenilworth producing about 1,500 tons per day. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, September 8, 1910, p.2)

Castle Valley's old Bamberger coach was totally wrecked "Sunday evening" (September 11, 1910), after a run away because of a broken coupling. (Eastern Utah Advocate, September 15, 1910, p.1)

A. L. and George Fullmer of Orangeville filed a lien against the Castle Valley for $7,470.67 with the Carbon County recorder on September 15, 1910. (Eastern Utah Advocate, September 22, 1910, p.3)

Castle Valley Railroad ordered a 2-8-0 from the American Locomotive Company. (Eastern Utah Advocate, October 6, 1910, p.5)

Two additional locomotives ordered. (Eastern Utah Advocate, October 13, 1910)

Eastern Utah Railroad organized to build an electric line between Wellington on D&RG and the town of Emery. Grading was to begin "next week". Organizers included Henry Wade, president, Orange Seely, vice president, Dr. I. R. Parsons, a dentist in Price, treasurer, Dr. M. V. Maloney, secretary. W. J. Tidwell, W. S. Avery, and H. C. Pitts were directors. (Eastern Utah Advocate, October 20, 1910)

D&RG announced it would build a new branch south from Mesa (just south of Jordan Narrows) along the west shore of Utah Lake to Elberta, then to Nephi, to connect with the San Pete Valley Branch. (Eastern Utah Advocate, October 20, 1910)

201 coke ovens at Castle Gate returned to production. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, November 3, 1910, p.8)

Iron Mountain, St. George and Grand Canyon Railroad incorporated. The engineering was being done by E. M. Burgess of Salt Lake City, who arrived in Milford "Wednesday" (November 2, 1910) with fifteen men to begin the survey. Grading was to begin as soon as the survey was completed. (Eastern Utah Advocate, November 20, 1910, "Surveying Road To Beaver City", from another paper dated November 7, 1910)

Consolidated Fuel producing 1,200 tons per day. Castle Valley Coal was producing about half of that. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, December 1, 1910, p.1)

The survey of the Helper Western was approved by the U. S. Land Office. (Eastern Utah Advocate, December 22, 1910, "Railroad Survey Up From Helper")

Southern Utah ordered a 91-ton locomotive from Lima and a 160-ton locomotive from American Locomotive Company, for a total of four locomotives. They also ordered thirty-seven 50-ton cars. (Eastern Utah Advocate, December 22, 1910, "Two New Engines For The Southern") (copied 11/5/82)

Southern Utah and Castle Valley railroads each get a new locomotive, with two more for the Southern Utah enroute from the east. (Eastern Utah Advocate, December 29, 1910, p.5)

1911

Consolidated Fuel and Castle Valley Coal file a complaint with the ICC, alleging railroad rates were too high. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, February 2, 1911, "Claim Rates Too High")

Consolidated Fuel and Castle Valley Coal went before the ICC to gain a through rate for products shipped over the Southern Utah and Castle Valley railroads. The claim was filed "last week". (Eastern Utah Advocate, February 9, 1911)

Eastern Utah Railroad filed its articles of incorporation with the (Salt Lake?) County Clerk on "Tuesday" (February 15, 1911), according to the Herald-Republican of February 21, 1911. Dr. Maloney was a dentist, giving up his practice to devote time to the building of the railroad. (Eastern Utah Advocate, February 23, 1911, "Looks Good For Road Out Of Wellington")

The railroad of Union Coal Company was to run four miles west of Helper, then four miles along the coal fields. (Eastern Utah Advocate, March 2, 1911, "Railroad Going Out Of Helper")

Union Coal and Coke Company incorporated. (Eastern Utah Advocate, March 9, 1911, "Spring Canyon People Are Now Incorporated")

A. B. Apperson resigned as superintendent of Southern Utah and Castle Valley railroads to take a similar position with Utah Copper Company. (Eastern Utah Advocate, March 9, 1911)

Southern Utah Fuel Company purchased Salina Coal Company. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, March 16, 1911, p.3)

Grading for Eastern Utah Railroad began "yesterday" (March 22, 1911) at Wellington, and a connection with D&RG. (Eastern Utah Advocate, March 23, 1911, "Town and Country")

Grading of Eastern Utah Railroad underway between Wellington and Orangeville, except for two bridges, according to Henry Wade. (Eastern Utah Advocate, April 6, 1911, "Eastern Utah Road Assured")

Independent Coal and Coke received a new Shay locomotive. (Eastern Utah Advocate, June 22, 1911)

Black Hawk Coal Company was to begin shipping coal in about ninety days. The grading for their railroad was being done by Fullmer Brothers of Price and Orangeville, with about forty teams working. The tipple was about three-quarters of a mile from the Castle Valley Railroad. (Eastern Utah Advocate, July 6, 1911)

Consolidated Fuel bought all of the holdings of American Steel and Fuel Company in Miller Creek and around Hiawatha. (Eastern Utah Advocate, July 13, 1911)

"Thompsons and Ballard" (Ballard and Thompson) railroad incorporated. Ballard was a prominent livestock man in eastern Utah. Neslen, Hahn, and Darke were with the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy agency in Salt Lake City. Bauer was the manager of Salt Lake Hardware. (Eastern Utah Advocate, July 20, 1911)

Construction of new D&RG depot in Price was begun. (Eastern Utah Advocate, July 27, 1911)

Eastern Utah Railroad was being graded, with twelve teams at work between Wellington and Cleveland. (Eastern Utah Advocate, July 27, 1911)

During ICC hearing in Salt Lake City, Southern Utah and Castle Valley railroads testify that they charge forty cents per ton to haul coal, approximately two cents per ton-mile. There was also a statement of Southern Utah's earnings from traffic other than coal. (Eastern Utah Advocate, July 27, 1911, pp.1,6)

D&RG was concerned over a survey being done in Salina Canyon "by Harriman Interests". (Eastern Utah Advocate, August 3, 1911)

Southern Utah held a special stockholders meeting to get Consolidated Fuel to extend its credit to the Southern Utah Railroad to allow Southern Utah to extend its line to Salina Canyon. (Eastern Utah Advocate, August 3, 1911)

Description of the Taos, Sierra Nevada, and San Francisco Railroad. The route in Utah was from Greyson, through White Canyon, Hite, Escalante, Panquitch, Parowan, Lund, and Stateline, through San Juan, Garfield, and Iron counties toward Goldfield in Nevada. The railroad was to cross the Colorado River at Hite. (Eastern Utah Advocate, August 17, 1911)

Southern Utah was putting in a second water tank, and the combined Southern Utah and Castle Valley railroads were to build joint machine shops and roundhouse in Price. (Eastern Utah Advocate, August 24, 1911)

The depot, baggage room, and restaurant at Thistle burned completely on the morning of September 5, 1911. (Eastern Utah Advocate, September 7, 1911)

Castle Valley Coal producing 800 tons per day. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, October 12, 1911, p.3)

A. P. Apperson resigned as superintendent of Southern Utah Railroad to devote full time to Castle Valley Railroad as general traffic manager in Salt Lake City. (Eastern Utah Advocate, October 19, 1911)

Castle Valley Railroad was to receive two new locomotives from Lima "any day now", which would bring the total number to four. Castle Valley Railroad was using its own depot in Price, located about two blocks east of the Southern Utah depot. The Castle Valley agent was at their depot between 3 and 6 p.m. (Eastern Utah Advocate, December 7, 1911)

D&RG's new depot in Price opened on "Monday" (December 18, 1911). The first train to use the new depot was No. 6, The Atlantic Coast Limited, pulled by locomotive numbers 781 and 790. The depot was under construction for three months and cost $15,000.00. The article included a photograph. (Eastern Utah Advocate, December 21, 1911)

1912

F. N. Cameron was working thirty men at Panther Canyon and was expected to open his mine soon. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, January 4, 1912)

Black Hawk Coal company organized, according to Salt Lake Mining Review. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, January 4, 1912)

(The issues of the Eastern Utah Advocate from January 11, 1912 to May 16, 1912, except the single February 15, 1912 issue, were missing from the microfilm, and not available for examination.)

W. G. Sharp and William Ashton, Oregon Short Line's chief engineer in charge surveying the Utah Coal Railroad were in Price. W. G. Sharp was to exercise his option on the Consolidated Fuel and Southern Utah Railroad for building of the Utah Coal road. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, May 16, 1912, p.1)

Jesse Knight purchased all land needed for the right of way for his railroad in Spring Canyon. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, May 16, 1912, p.5)

W. H. Bancroft denied any connection between the Ballard and Thompson Railroad and the Harriman Lines. (Eastern Utah Advocate, May 23, 1912)

Utah Fuel was operating five mines in Utah. They were building fifty cottages at Willow Creek for when that mine opened. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, May 23, 1912, p.5)

Fifty cottages being built for mine workers at Black Hawk. Contractor was Sam C. Sherrill of Salt Lake City. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, May 23, 1912, p.5)

Five or six miners are at work developing a six foot vein owned by Jesse Knight. Work is in charge of ex-sheriff Storrs. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, May 30, 1912, p.5)

Frank N. Cameron working twenty men at Panther mine. Development work was producing about four cars per week. Coal was hauled to D&RG by wagon. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, May 30, 1912, p.5)

Consolidated Fuel Company was purchased by United States Smelting, Refining and Mining Company "last Saturday" (June 1, 1912), with negotiations lasting four months. Black Hawk Coal Company was already owned by the United States company. The United States company owned the former Orem interests in the Castle Valley Coal Company. (Eastern Utah Advocate, June 6, 1912)

Utah Coal Railway line had been located and surveyed from Spanish Fork to Mohrland. (Eastern Utah Advocate, June 6, 1912, p.5)

The land for Jesse Knight's Spring Canyon mine was originally filed on as stone and timber land, consisting of 160 acres. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, June 6, 1912, p.5)

Southern Utah Railroad was paid an insurance settlement for the loss of a portion of its bridge over Drunkards Wash by fire from a passing locomotive. (Eastern Utah Advocate, June 6, 1912)

Black Hawk company reorganized as "adjunct" of United States Smelting, Refining and Mining Company. The new company will make expenditures of $150,000.00 to double production. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, June 27, 1912, p.1, "Move Headquarters")

The ICC ruled in favor of Consolidated Fuel and Castle Valley Coal companies in their claim concerning high rates for their coal shipped over the D&RG. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, July 4, 1912)

The double tracking of the D&RG between Castle Gate and Kyune was commenced. The contractor was Kilpatrick Brothers. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, July 11, 1912, p.1)

Jesse Knight's road to be graded by Straw and Welsh of Springville. The railroad was to be five miles long, and completed in sixty days. (Eastern Utah Advocate, July 11, 1912, from Provo Herald for July 4, 1911)

F. N. Cameron sold his mines at Panther and Castle Gate to W. G. Sharp interests. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, July 11, 1912, p.1)

F. N. Cameron's Willow Creek and Panther properties taken over by W. G. Sharp interests. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, July 18, 1912, p.6)

Castle Gate Coal and Coke Company corporation dissolved. 700 acres sold to W. G. Sharp interests by F. N. Cameron. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, July 18, 1912, p.4)

Tracklaying of the Ballard and Thompson had progressed to Camp Bong. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, July 18, 1912, p.5)

Castle Valley Coal Company installed a new Jeffery tipple and three box car loaders at Mohrland. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, July 18, 1912, p.5)

National Fuel Company filed a $450,000.00 mortgage to begin development work and build the Helper and Western Railroad. (Eastern Utah Advocate, July 18, 1912)

"A Branch Line Will Tap Alta" (Eastern Utah Advocate, July 25, 1912)

Provo and Eastern Railway to build from Springville to Steamboat Springs, including a hydro-electric dam on the Green River. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, August 1, 1912, p.1)

The Knight interests purchased coal land in Spring Canyon from Utah Fuel. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, August 1, 1912, p.5)

The Knight interests incorporated the Spring Canyon Coal Company for their coal interests on July 27, 1912. (Eastern Utah Advocate, August 1, 1912)

The Ballard and Thompson Railroad was completed, with a "5 mile spur to serve Western Fuel Company". (Eastern Utah Advocate, August 15, 1912)

Neslen became a post office. American Fuel Company was located in Neslen. (Eastern Utah Advocate, August 22, 1912)

W. B. Williams was the general superintendent of Utah Fuel. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, August 29, 1912, p.8)

John Cronin is in charge of both the Eureka Hill and the Spring Canyon Railroad. Spring Canyon Railroad recently bought an 80-ton Baldwin locomotive. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, September 5, 1912, p.5)

The grading contract for Utah Railway was let to Utah Construction Company. The contract was for the grading of twenty-eight miles between Mohrland and Castle Gate, and called for completion of the grade and bridges within ninety days. The Utah Railway was being built to do away with the five percent grades of the Castle Valley Railroad, and would cross the Southern Utah Railroad just above Castle Junction. After crossing the Spring Canyon properties, the new line goes to Half Way House, just below Consolidated Fuel's properties at Panther Canyon. The survey for the line above Castle Gate was not yet complete. Four carloads of equipment and one steam shovel were at Mohrland. (Eastern Utah Advocate, September 12, 1912, p.1, "Utah Coal Road Lets Contract", also p.7 "Work On Coal Road")

The combined Southern Utah and Castle Valley railroads were shipping about fifty cars per day. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, September 26, 1912, p.5)

ADVERTISEMENT: "Laborers, Teamsters, Station Men for construction work on new railroad building from Black Hawk to Castle Gate", by Utah Construction Company. (Eastern Utah Advocate, October 3, 1912, p.8)

Survey of Utah Railway was 800 feet above the D&RG at Tucker. The survey between Castle Gate and Soldier Summit had not yet been determined. W. G. Sharp, president of Utah Railway and United States Smelting, Refining and Mining, was the former president of Pleasant Valley Coal Company. (Eastern Utah Advocate, October 31, 1912, p.1)

Ballard and Thompson completed and in operation between Ballard and Neslen, the site of the mine of American Fuel Company. the line was five miles long and was built with 65-pound rail. Coal is already being shipped out. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, October 31, 1912, p.3)

Utah Construction Company was awarded a $1.5 million contract for D&RG's "detour" around Soldiers Summit in Denver on November 19, 1912. (Eastern Utah Advocate, November 21, 1912, p.1)

The contract for the grading of Utah Railway for the segment between two miles east of Thistle and Diamond Fork was let to C. L. Crandall, H. T. Reynolds and Henry L. Sumison, all of Springville. (Eastern Utah Advocate, November 21, 1912, p.6)

Southern Utah and Castle Valley railroads replaced their original telephone line with better poles and wire. (Eastern Utah Advocate, November 28, 1912, p.5)

The survey for the Utah Railway between Castle Gate and Soldiers Summit was decided on. The route was on the south side of Price River Canyon, with several tunnels and a two percent grade. (Eastern Utah Advocate, November 28, 1912, p.5)

The grading of Utah Railway's line ten miles up Spanish Fork Canyon was begun, including a 500 foot long tunnel at Thistle, the longest on the new line. The right of way through Mapleton had still not been acquired. (Eastern Utah Advocate, November 28, 1912, p.6, "Start Construction Work")

A description of D&RG's Soldier Summit detour. (Eastern Utah Advocate, December 12, 1912, p.1, "Spending Millions On Improvements")

1913

Consolidated Fuel bought 160 acres at Black Hawk for $11,000.00. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, January 2, 1913, p.5)

There were four new mines in 1912. Neslen, Willow Creek, Panther Canyon (sold by F. N. Cameron to Castle Gate Coal Company), and Storrs, where a new method of conveying is being tried. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, January 2, 1913, p.2)

Coal from the United States company's mines was used in its smelters in Midvale, Bingham, and Tintic. Coal was also sold to the Utah market. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, January 2, 1913, p.6, "W. G. Sharp Looks Over Property")

Utah Railway contemplated a tunnel through Castle Rock on the south side of Castle Gate, about 100 feet above D&RG's tracks. (Eastern Utah Advocate, January 9, 1913, p.5)

Utah Railway sued Susannah A. Pace for condemnation of right of way for property in Spanish Fork Canyon. They paid $7,500.00. (Eastern Utah Advocate, January 16, 1913, p.5)

D&RG completed its double tracks between Thistle and Tucker. (Eastern Utah Advocate, January 16, 1913, p.6)

A property owner in Spanish Fork Canyon sued D&RG to prevent the construction companies from crossing his property during the double tracking of D&RG's line. In another suit, D&RG sued for the condemnation of right of way between Tucker and Soldier Summit. (Eastern Utah Advocate, January 16, 1912, p.8)

Utah Construction Company had six shovels working on D&RG's detour line over Soldier Summit. (Eastern Utah Advocate, January 23, 1913, p.2, "Many Men Working")

Utah Railway sued Matt Adler for condemnation of right of way. (Eastern Utah Advocate, January 23, 1913, p.5)

The locomotive for the six-mile, privately owned railroad of Jesse Knight's Spring Canyon Coal Company arrived "last week". George A. Storrs, former Utah County sheriff, was superintendent of both the railroad and the coal company's mine. (Eastern Utah Advocate, January 23, 1913, p.6, "Still Another Big Coal Camp Property To Ship Soon")

All the side tracks and yard tracks of the Southern Utah and Castle Valley railroads were "choked" with loaded cars. D&RG lacked the locomotives to move the trains. (Eastern Utah Advocate, January 23, 1913, p.8, "Neighborhood News")

D&RG had surveyed a branch to Huntington Canyon. (Eastern Utah Advocate, January 23, 1913, p.8, "Neighborhood News")

A review of coal mine properties and owners. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, January 30, 1913, p.7, "Carbon County's Coal Interests")

United States Smelting, Refining and Mining Company purchased "last year" 923,800 shares of Castle Valley Coal Company, virtually all of the issued shares of the authorized 1,500,000 shares, through its subsidiary, The Utah Company, for $2.50 per share. Included in the sale were 4,000 acres of coal lands, 1,200 acres of agricultural lands, the townsite of Mohrland, the Castle Valley Railroad, the Mohrland Mercantile, Western Fuel Company of Salt Lake City, and Western Pacific Fuel Company of San Francisco. (Eastern Utah Advocate, January 30, 1913, p.7, "Carbon County's Mining Interests")

All stock of Consolidated Fuel Company was owned by United States Smelting, Refining and Mining Company, consisting of 1,500,000 shares of the authorized 2,000,000 shares, issued at $1.50 per share. Consolidated owned 3,600 acres of coal lands. (Eastern Utah Advocate, January 30, 1913, p.7, "Carbon County's Mining Interests")

All stock of Black Hawk Coal Company was owned by United States Smelting, Refining and Mining Company, having been purchased from the late David Eccles and Associates. (Eastern Utah Advocate, January 30, 1913, p.7, "Carbon County's Mining Interests")

(David Eccles died unexpectedly on December 5, 1912, at the height of his business career. See Leonard J. Arrington, David Eccles, Pioneer Western Industrialist, Utah State University, 1975, for additional information about Eccles' railroad, mining and industrial interests.)

The terminal for Utah Railway was changed from Spanish Fork to Provo due to the efforts of the Provo Commercial Club Financial Committee and Right of Way Committee. (Eastern Utah Advocate, February 6, 1913, p.1, "Terminus Of Sharp Road To Be Provo")

Work was well under way on the D&RG detour line above Tucker, with twenty-three shovels working. (Eastern Utah Advocate, February 6, 1913, p.1, "Dirt Is Flying")

Utah Railway announced that they would spend $1.5 million on new cars. (Eastern Utah Advocate, February 13, 1913, p.7, "Buying Coal Cars")

Most of the work by Utah Construction Company was being done between Mohrland, Hiawatha, and Castle Gate. (Eastern Utah Advocate, February 13, 1913, p.7, "Buying Coal Cars")

The Sharp coal properties had orders for 1,400 car loads of coal that couldn't be shipped due to lack of cars. (Eastern Utah Advocate, February 20, 1913, p.3, "Business Is Growing")

D&RG men stated that there were fifteen shovels at work on Soldier Summit detour, with plans to increase number to twenty-two. There were 1,000 men and 250 teams working on the job. (Eastern Utah Advocate, February 20, 1913, p.8, "Rushing The Work")

Chief engineer Ashton said that Provo was almost certainly to be the terminal for the "Utah Coal Road". Spanish Fork was shown as the terminal in the blueprints. (Eastern Utah Advocate, February 27, 1913, p.3, "Sure Of Terminal")

Kenilworth produced a record 2,339 tons of coal in March 1913. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, March 6, 1913, p.4)

Leon Felix Rains of Los Angeles filed application to purchase coal lands on March 12, 1913. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, March 13, 1913, p.2)

American Fuel announced that it would sell coal only in car load lots. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, March 13, 1913, p.6)

Utah Railway yard at Martin is on several acres of the Oman ranch. (Eastern Utah Advocate, April 10, 1913, p.5, "Neighborhood and City")

Southern Utah and Castle Valley train crews began to tie up at East Hiawatha instead of Price, as had been the custom in the past. Conductor J. B. Darrah of Southern Utah Railroad got a new red caboose. (Eastern Utah Advocate, April 17, 1913, p.5, "Price and Vicinity")

Salt Lake and Utah let a contract for the grading of its line through the Jordan Narrows. Grading to begin "this week", and was to be the heaviest grading on the line. (Eastern Utah Advocate, April 24, 1913, p.4, "Contract Let For Grading Interurban")

Ogden interests, M. S. Browning and fourteen others, each file on 160 acres of coal lands each, making for 3,000 acres owned by one body. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, May 8, 1913, p.1)

Assets of the United States Smelting, Refining and Mining listed. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, May 8, 1913, p.2, "W. G. Sharp Tells Of Coal Holdings")

Turner and Silvagni were the contractors for the abutment work along Utah Railway between Mohrland and Helper. Contract cost was $40,000.00. (Eastern Utah Advocate, May 15, 1913, p.5, "Neighborhood and City")

750 workers for the subcontractors for Utah Construction Company on D&RG's detour line over Soldiers Summit went on strike. The strikers wanted $2.50 for nine hours, instead of $2.50 for ten hours. They also wanted bath tubs. There were 7,000 men working for Utah Construction Company, with 3,000 near Tucker and 4,000 working in Price Canyon and Spanish Fork Canyon. (Eastern Utah Advocate, June 12, 1913, p.1, "Shorter Hours, Bath Tubs Also")

The membership of the striking union at Tucker was down to twenty men. Wattis and Bechtel resumed work. (Eastern Utah Advocate, June 19, 1913, pp.6,8, "Agitators Jailed, Strike Is Broken")

D&RG "acquires" Southern Utah Railroad and Castle Valley Railroad. Negotiations were under way for Utah Railway to lease D&RG tracks from Castle Gate to the mouth of Spanish Fork Canyon. (Eastern Utah Advocate, June 26, 1913, p.7, "Denver And Rio Grande Takes Over Two Roads")

Standard Coal Company incorporated on June 5, 1913. The contract for grading for their railroad was let to Wattis Construction Company. The railroad was to be three and a half miles long and was to connect with the line of the Spring Canyon Coal Company. (Eastern Utah Advocate, July 3, 1913, p.1, "Sweets Back In Coal Game")

"Utah Railway Also Likely Sold" (Eastern Utah Advocate, July 3, 1913, p.6)

Standard Coal Company to market their coal as "Castle Gate Coal". (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, July 8, 1913, p.6)

F. A. Sweet, president of Standard Coal Company, announced a new railroad to be built from the Standard coal mine to Storrs. (Coal Index: Carbon County News, July 8, 1913, p.6)

There is a government suit filed against the Denver and Rio Grande over its ownership of Utah Fuel. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, July 17, 1913, p.2)

An automobile road, called the Midland Trail, is complete between price and Colton. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, July 17, 1913, p.1)

The contract for the construction of the new state capital building was held by Stewart Construction Company. The granite stone work was being done by Utah Consolidated Stone Company. The completion had been delayed from July 1, 1915 to January 1, 1916. (Eastern Utah Advocate, July 24, 1913, p.8, "Capital Completion Delayed")

(Utah Consolidated Stone Company organized and owned the Salt Lake & Alta Railroad to lease the old D&RG Alta Branch, and to move the granite for the capital building from the quarries at Little Cottonwood Canyon to the capital site.)

Patrick W. Callahan, roadmaster of the Southern Utah and Castle Valley railroads, was killed. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, August 21, 1913, p.1)

Agreement between D&RG and Utah Railway. (Eastern Utah Advocate, November 6, 1913, p.3, "Utah Railroad Abandons Work")

Cameron Coal Company organized by F. N. Cameron for his new mine at Castle Gate. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, November 6, 1913, p.4)

H. G. Williams was general manager of Utah Fuel. (Coal Index: Carbon County News, November 6, 1913, p.9)

D&RG's new detour line over Soldiers Summit was opened to general traffic "this week". The new line was projected as saving $600,000.00 per year in operating costs. Construction began in February. (Eastern Utah Advocate, November 13, 1913, p.2, "Soldier Summit Grade An Engineering Triumph")

Salina Canyon Railroad incorporated. (Eastern Utah Advocate, November 13, 1913, p.3, "Many Railroads Projected For Utah")

Passenger trains began using D&RG's new Soldier Summit detour line. Passenger trains had been waiting for the new line to be ballasted, freight trains had been using the new line "for the past weeks". (Eastern Utah Advocate, November 20, 1913, p.4, "Price and Vicinity")

American Fuel Company shipping 600 tons of coal daily. Most going to Colorado or to Green River for use on D&RG's locomotives. (Eastern Utah Advocate, December 18, 1913, p.4, "Price and Vicinity")

1914

D&RG Sunnyside Branch to be double tracked to move coal to Pacific coast, with the opening of the Panama Canal. (Coal Index: Carbon County News, January 22, 1914, p.1)

D. D. Houtz, attorney for Southern Utah Railroad and Consolidated Fuel Company stated that upon completion of the Utah Railway, the line from Price to Castle Junction would be abandoned by the coal company and its rails taken up. (Eastern Utah Advocate, February 26, 1914, p.5, "Price and Vicinity")

Cameron Coal Company owns 360 acres. A new tipple was completed and its output was 600 tons per day. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, April 2, 1914, p.1, "Cameron Property Modernly Equipped")

Due to reduction of railroad rates for Wyoming coal, Independent was working three to four days per week supplying the D&RG. Consolidated was working two days per week. Sunnyside was working six days per week, with all coal going for coke. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, April 9, 1914, p.1)

Standard Coal Company began shipping coal on February 10, 1914. (Eastern Utah Advocate, February 26, 1914, p.1, "Standard Company Has Splendid Record")

Portion of Utah Railway between Thistle and Provo was in service as a second track for D&RG. Fourteen miles of Utah Railway between mines and Castle Gate completed, remainder to be complete by September. D&RG was operating the Southern Utah Railroad. (Eastern Utah Advocate, June 25, 1914, p.1, "New Coal Road Nearly Completed")

The Southwestern Pacific Railroad was to build from Montrose, Colorado to Las Vegas. Articles of incorporation and maps were filed within the last few weeks. (Eastern Utah Advocate, July 9, 1914, p.2, "May Be Extension Of Gould Lines")

The passenger and express traffic of the Southern Utah Railroad was leased to N. A. Williams, beginning "about September 1st". Utah Railway was to handle all of the coal traffic. (Eastern Utah Advocate, August 6, 1914, p.1, "Southern Utah Road Leased To Williams")

Castle Valley Coal Company held its annual meeting in Evanston, Wyoming. J. H. Mays, president, E. L. Carpenter, first vice president, Moroni Heiner, second vice president, J. E. Forrester, secretary-treasurer. The directors included D. H. Livingston, W. S. McCornick, H. R. MacMillian. "The old board of directors is re-elected" (Eastern Utah Advocate, August 6, 1914, p.7, Price and Vicinity")

150 men were laid off, having been employed in laying track to the tipples. (Eastern Utah Advocate, August 13, 1914, p.1, "Large Number Laid Off At Consolidated Camps")

H. G. Ballard was living in Bedford, England. (Eastern Utah Advocate, October 1, 1914, p.1, "Ballard Writes Of War")

A railroad was to be built between Marysvale and Kaibab National Forest. An informal poll of the House of Representatives showed a lack of support. (Eastern Utah Advocate, October 1, 1914, p.1, "Forestry Service Will Not Recommend Railroad")

Most of Utah Construction Company's forces had been pulled out of Carbon County. Work on Utah Railway between Mohrland and Castle Gate "is about wound up". (Eastern Utah Advocate, October 1, 1914, p.3, "Price and Vicinity")

Castle Valley and Southern Utah railroads laid off almost all trainmen. (Coal Index: Carbon County News, November 19, 1914, p.3)

Utah Railway bought the Castle Valley Railroad for $154,000.00, the cost of construction, plus interest. Utah Railway was to take over the operation of the Castle Valley Railroad as of January 1, 1915. A committee of Castle Valley stockholders "conferred" with the officers of Utah Railway in the office of J. H. Mays on "Saturday" (November 21, 1914). (Eastern Utah Advocate, November 26, 1914, p.8, "Takes Over Castle Valley")

Spring Canyon Coal at Storrs producing 1,000 tons per day. (Coal Index: Carbon County News, December 3, 1914, p.9)

The first 100 of 500 cars ordered by Utah Railway had been received. The rest were between Price and Pittsburgh. Utah Railway was turned over to the operating department of D&RG "some thirty days ago". (Eastern Utah Advocate, December 17, 1914, p.1, "More Cars Ordered")

1915

Bingham and Garfield shut down in September 1914 due to lack of copper market because of European war. Two Mallets and six switch engines had been out of service, and were returned to service on "Tuesday" (April 27, 1915). Copper was selling at 18.5 cents per pound, the highest since 1907. (Eastern Utah Advocate, April 30, 1915, p.1, "Utah Copper Mines Working Full Blast")

[NOTE: Final issue of Eastern Utah Advocate was Friday, May 25, 1915 (Volume 21, number 21). The newspaper had changed from being publishing on Thursday to publishing on Friday on February 5, 1915 (Volume 21, number 5).

 

The office and printing equipment of the Eastern Utah Advocate were taken over by the original publisher, R. W. Crockett, under receivership and later foreclosure. The newspaper resumed publication under a new name, The Sun, as of June 1, 1915. The first issue was on Friday June 4, 1915 (Volume 1, number 1).

 

The editorial and publication interests of the Eastern Utah Advocate were transferred to the Carbon County News, which then changed its name to the News-Advocate.]

E. L. Carpenter, president of Southern Utah Railroad and Castle Valley Railroad and United States Fuel Company, made assurances that the railroads were not to be abandoned. The railroads were not "paying". All coal was being shipped by way of the Utah Railway, except "what little coal is used at price and east of here". Local freight, passenger, express, and mail business was going out of Price by way of the Southern Utah and Castle Valley railroads. (The Sun, August 13, 1915, p.3, "How To Help Out Local Conditions")

Carbon Fuel Company incorporated, with L. F. Rains as president. (Coal Index: News Advocate, September 17, 1915, p.3)

Reference was made to court appeals being made in the "A. A. Sweet case". (Coal Index: News Advocate, October 1, 1915)

Both Union Pacific and Denver and Rio Grande say they will build lines into the Unitah basin. D&RG from Soldier Summit. UP from their Park City Branch. (The Sun, October 15, 1915, p.1, "Surveyors Busy In Unitah Basin" and "Union Pacific Will Build To The Basin")

The merger of Castle Valley Coal Company, Consolidated Fuel Company, Panther Coal Company, and Black Hawk Coal Company into the $10 million United States Fuel Company was blocked by minority stockholder of the Castle Valley Coal Company. There was a severe car shortage. (The Sun, October 15, 1915, p.2, "The United States Fuel Company Merger Put Through Down East")

Carbon Fuel's railroad was to be in commission soon. (Coal Index: News Advocate, November 5, 1915, p.3)

Union Pacific to build a line into the Unitah Basin. (Coal Index: News Advocate, December 3, 1915, p.1)

Survey of D&RG line into the Unitah Basin runs from Myton to Independence, east to the confluence of Dry Gulch and Unitah Rivers, one mile south of Fort Duchesne, over Sandridge, then east. (The Sun, December 17, 1915, p.3, "D&RG Survey Is Over Sandridge, Line Runs South Vernal Dugway")

R. S. Lovett confirms that Union Pacific was to build into the Uintah basin in the spring. (Coal Index: News Advocate, December 24, 1915)

T. A. Ketchum filed a suit against Pleasant Valley Coal, Utah Fuel, and D&RG. (Coal Index: News Advocate, December 24, 1915, p.1)

Construction of D&RG Unitah Branch was up to the directors in New York City. The officers of the railroad were in New York making a presentation during meeting for annual budget. (The Sun, December 31, 1915, p.1, "Considering Unitah Line")

1916

A. B. Apperson resigned as superintendent of D&RG to become general manager of United States Fuel. C. E. Van Law was president of United States Fuel. (Coal Index: News Advocate, January 7, 1916)

United States Fuel Company incorporated "Monday" (January 3, 1916). (News-Advocate, January 7, 1916, p.1)

E. L. Carpenter resigned as president of United States Fuel Company. He had been with Pleasant Valley Coal Company from 1884 to 1902, then with Consolidation Coal Company in West Virginia from 1902 to 1906, then with Phelps Dodge at Dawson, New Mexico from 1906 to 1909. In 1909 he became assistant to W. G. Sharp of United States Smelting, Refining and Mining. In 1912 he became manager of the combined interests of Consolidated Fuel Company, Castle Valley Coal Company, Black Hawk Coal Company, Panther Coal Company, Southern Utah Railroad, and Castle Valley Railroad. carpenter was active in the management of the Southern Utah and the Castle Valley railroads, and active in the promotion and building of the Utah Railway. Carpenter would "probably" take the position of president of United States Smelting, Refining and Mining Company, due to the ill health of W. G. Sharp. (The Sun, January 7, 1916, p.7, "Carpenter Quits The Coal Game")

A. B. Apperson resigned as general superintendent of the Utah Lines of D&RG, as of January 8, 1916. Previous to working for D&RG, he had been general superintendent of the Southern Utah Railroad and the Castle Valley Railroad. Apperson was mentioned as a possible replacement for E. L. Carpenter, after his resignation. (The Sun, January 7, 1916, p.7, "A. B. Apperson Resigns Coal Company")

Timetable for Southern Utah/castle Valley railroads. No.1 departed Mohrland at 7:15 a.m., arrived at Price at 8:45 a.m. No.2 departed Price at 10:30 a.m., arrived at Mohrland at 12:01 p.m. (The Sun, January 16, 1916, p.7)

D&RG filed its proposed route into the Unitah Basin with the Vernal Land Office. (The Sun, February 25, 1916, p.2, "From Colton To Unitah Country")

Southern Utah's first locomotive was moved to Mexico to help alleviate the power shortage on the National Railways of Mexico. The locomotive was to be used between United States Smelting's properties in Pachucha and Laredo. The locomotive was "thoroughly" overhauled by D&RG's shops in Salt Lake City. The power shortages in Mexico were due to the revolution there, making it necessary for the smelting company to furnish its own power for its trains. The locomotive left Salt Lake City "last Saturday' (February 20, 1916). (The Sun, February 25, 1916, p.3, "Goes To Mexico")

San Pedro, Los Angeles and Salt Lake was to send surveyors into the Unitah Basin as soon as snows permitted. D&RG was considering a separate corporation to build its line into the Unitah Basin. The new D&RG line was expected to cost $5 million. (The Sun, March 31, 1916, p.7, "Salt Lake Route To Build Road")

Southern Utah Railroad was losing $10,000.00 per year. At some future time the steam equipment may be removed and replaced by "gasoline motor service". Southern Utah may also be electrified. (The Sun, April 14, 1916, p.1, "Eastern People Visit Coal Camps")

Cameron Coal was located at Castle Gate. (Coal Index: Eastern Utah Advocate, June 23, 1916, p.4) Also in Carbon County News, June 23, 1916.

A. B. Apperson, vice president and general manager of United States Fuel, announced that his company had purchased a McKeen motor car to operate between Price and the mines, for the benefit of company employees. (News-Advocate, June 23, 1916, "Mining Notes", from Salt Lake Mining Review)

Cameron Coal Company mine near Castle Gate. (Coal Index: News Advocate, June 23, 1916, p.4)

Carbon Fuel Company was shipping about 300 tons per day. (Coal Index: News Advocate, June 23, 1916, p.4)

(NOTE: The Sun was not examined for August to November 1916 due to potential duplication of news.)

A political letter was printed, stating that Simon Bamberger offered the City of Bountiful $25,000.00 if they would deny a franchise to Utah Light and Railway. The check was written out, but refused by the mayor. (News-Advocate, November 2, 1916)

Discussion of Utah Railway and D&RG agreement. (The Sun, November 17, 1916, p.1, "May Take Over Its Own Line And Operate")

"J. M. Riley has gone to Omaha for the electric motor to be used on the Hiawatha Branch." He was to spend two to three weeks in Omaha learning to maintain and operate the new gasoline motor car, which was said to be seventy feet long. (News-Advocate, November 22, 1916)

1917

The new gasoline motor car stood in Price "all day Monday" (January 1, 1917). The car had arrived in Price under its own power from Omaha. The car ran to Hiawatha on "Tuesday" (January 2, 1917). Riley was the engineer. (News-Advocate, January 4, 1917, "Gasoline Car Here")

The D&RG Scofield train shipped about 1,400 tons per day. (Coal Index: News Advocate, January 18, 1917, p.5)

Large article about Utah Railway. The line from Castle Gate to the coal fields was completed more than two years before. Operation of Utah Railway was taken over by D&RG with the stipulation that after two years Utah Railway could take over the privilege of operation at the end of the next year. The smelting company was dissatisfied with the D&RG service, especially to the United States Fuel mines, which led the smelting company to serve notice on November 1, 1916 that Utah Railway would exercise operation privilege as of November 1, 1917. (News-Advocate, January 18, 1917, p.1)

The gasoline motor car on Southern Utah Railroad was not yet in operation, "not efficient enough". (News-Advocate, January 18, 1917, "Hiawatha Gleanings")

United States Smelting served notice to D&RG on November 1, 1916 that the Utah Railway would take over operation of its own line as of November 1, 1917. (The Sun, January 19, 1917, p.1, "Smelting Company To Take Back Road")

(NOTE: The Sun was not examined for January to June 1917 due to potential duplication of news.)

I. H. Luke was to be the superintendent of Utah Railway, formerly superintendent of D&RG Salt Lake Division for three years. (News-Advocate, February 1, 1917)

Utah Railway was to begin construction of a new Provo yard "soon", to be completed by November 1, 1917. (News-Advocate, March 22, 1917, "Utah Coal Route Plans Activities")

Utah Railway increased its order of coal cars, changing from 800 cars to 2,000 cars. (News-Advocate, April 5, 1917)

Descriptions of mine operations, "All Mines of Carbon County show great growth…" (News-Advocate, May 10, 1917)

George W. Heintz, general manager of United States Smelting, Refining and Mining and Utah Railway, resigned. He was replaced by I. H. Luke, former general manager of Southern Utah Railroad. (News-Advocate, May 17, 1917, "Coal Route Getting Ready")

Mammoth dam gave way on "Monday morning (June 25, 1917) between 6 and 7 a.m." (News-Advocate, June 28, 1917)

The break of the Mammoth dam destroyed twenty miles of D&RG mainline, including eight bridges, along with six to seven miles of the D&RG Scofield Branch, including four bridges. The D&RG Scofield switcher was marooned at Scofield. The D&RG depot at Castle Gate was destroyed when the rush of flood waters picked it up and smashed it against the Utah Fuel tipple. Five D&RG trains were marooned between Helper and Colton, along with two Mallet helper locomotives. (The Sun, June 29, 1917, p.1, "Mammoth Reservoir Is Gone")

The crest of the flood reached Price at about 11 p.m. on Monday night. The wooden Southern Utah bridge over the Price River at Price was destroyed by the flood waters on Monday night and Tuesday morning. (The Sun, June 29, 1917, p.1, "Mammoth Reservoir Is Gone")

(The flood waters took about eighteen hours to reach Price, 7 a.m. Monday morning to 11 p.m. Monday night.)

First D&RG train of coal went out of Price on "Tuesday" (July 3, 1917). (News-Advocate, July 5, 1917)

Most of the damage on D&RG from Mammoth flood was done between Kyune and Utah Railway Junction. Near Nolan, 1,500 feet of track was washed out. (The Sun, July 6, 1917, p.1, "Railroad Is Now Open To All Traffic")

There were seventy-five men working on the grading of Utah Railway's Provo yard. The yard was 1-1/4 mile long and was to be completed by November 1. (The Sun, July 6, 1917, p.2, "Around The Coal Camps Of Carbon County")

Mammoth dam was found to be faulty. Summaries of the report of the state engineer were published "Tuesday" (July 10, 1917) in Salt Lake City. The dam broke on Sunday June 24, 1917. (News-Advocate, July 12, 1917)

Gasoline motor car came down to the river, then passengers and mail was brought into Price by car. (News-Advocate, July 12, 1917, "Price Loses The Hiawatha Train")

Southern Utah Railroad abandoned passenger service "last Wednesday" (July 11, 1917), sixteen days after the Mammoth dam flood. The remaining passenger, mail and express business was turned over to Utah Railway to operate between Utah Railway Junction and the coal camps. The gasoline motor car, which was brought in from the east, and which was a failure on the Southern Utah grades, was being used instead of steam drawn trains. The locomotives of the Southern Utah and Castle Valley railroads were to be used in freight service, getting the coal to Utah Railway Junction. D&RG turned back the operation of the Southern Utah on June 1, 1917. No effort had been made to repair the washed out bridge over the Price River. A boxcar was serving as a temporary depot at Utah Railway Junction. (The Sun, July 13, 1917, p.1, "Southern Utah Tied Up") (copied 11/18/82)

Nothing had yet been done on the repair of the Southern Utah bridge over the Price River. Passenger serviced continued to be handled over the Utah Railway. Residents of Black Hawk, Mohrland and Hiawatha were complaining of the roundabout way of reaching Price. Castle Valley Railroad was "a thing of the past." The railroad had been "absorbed" by the Utah Railway. The Castle Valley ran from Hiawatha Junction to Mohrland, and Utah Railway built a new line. (The Sun, July 20, 1917, p.5, "Price And Nearby)

Utah Railway's new cars were arriving at the rate of twenty cars per day. The new Provo yard was about half complete. (The Sun, July 20, 1917, p.6, "Many New Cars Coming For Utah Railway")

D&RG's Pleasant Valley Branch was to be back in operation by August 10 or 20, 1917. Three hundred men were working on the reconstruction. (News-Advocate, August 2, 1917)

A 12-year old boy died from injuries received by being run over by a train at Black Hawk. The body was brought down to the washed-out Price River bridge by "the gasoline car of Utah Ry.", then transported by car to Price. (The Sun, August 10, 1917, p.2, "Both Legs Crushed")

Most of D&RG's double track between Utah Railway Junction and Kyune was back in service, except for a spot near Cameron and another near Kyune. (The Sun, August 10, 1917, p.6, "Double Track Is Now About Completed")

The first train on the rebuilt D&RG Scofield Branch went out on "last Monday evening at 5 o'clock" (August 20, 1917). Repairs on the final sections of the D&RG mainline were completed at Kyune and at Cameron. (The Sun, August 24, 1917, p.6, "Operators Must Make Good")

The delivery of a Utah Railway locomotive was delayed because the United States Railway Administration (USRA) had delayed all domestic production due to the war effort. (The Sun, August 24, 1917, p.6, "Carbon Operators Not Optimistic By A Long Shot")

Two of Utah Railway's locomotives had been shipped. (The Sun, October 12, 1917, p.5, "Short Stories Of The Week")

The facilities at Utah Railway's new Provo yard included two coaling trestles, a water tank, a 90-foot turntable, and a roundhouse and machine shops. The beams for the roundhouse had been put up "this week". (The Sun, October 12, 1917, p.8, "Utah Railway's Terminals About Completed At Provo")

Item about Utah Railway Provo yard, from Provo Post. (News-Advocate, November 22, 1917)

Two locomotives and 1,200 cars of Utah Railway arrived in Price "last Wednesday" (November 14, 1917). Two more locomotives were to arrive on November 29, 1917, and the other two were to arrive on December 1, 1917. (The Sun, November 16, 1917, p.1, "New Equipment here") (COMMENT: 100 cars? 200 cars?, 1,200 cars seems a bit high. I don't think that there would have been the yard capacity in the whole county to hold 1,200 cars, 200 additional cars would be take up a lot of trackage.)

Operation of Utah Railway was to begin "tomorrow" (Saturday December 1, 1917). (The Sun, November 30, 1917, p.8, "Everything Ready For Operation Of Utah")

First train of Utah Railway, with forty cars, ran on "Saturday morning" (December 1, 1917). (News-Advocate, December 6, 1917, "Coal Route Is Working Well")

Another Utah Railway locomotive arrived at Salt Lake City "last Wednesday" (December 5, 1917). It was to be "overhauled" by Oregon Short Line in their Salt Lake shops before being sent to the Utah Railway. (The Sun, December 7, 1917, p.5, "Price And Nearby")

A fifth Utah Railway locomotive ran out of the Oregon Short Line roundhouse in Salt Lake City under its own power "Sunday" (December 9, 1917), another was due out "this week". (The Sun, December 14, 1917, p.8, "Around The Coal camps; Personal And Otherwise")

1918

The tramway at Spring Canyon Coal Company's coal mine at Storrs was in operation. (News-Advocate, January 18, 1918)

D&RG sent the State of Utah a check for $4,022.94 to pay for the use of convicts to rebuild its line after the flood from the break of Mammoth dam. (News-Advocate, January 18, 1918)

The three mines of United States Fuel were putting out 6,000 tons per day. Utah Railway was running smoothly. (News-Advocate, January 18, 1918)

Utah Railway was shipping about 100 cars of coal per day. (News-Advocate, January 24, 1918)

A. A. Sweet was F. A. Sweet's brother. (News-Advocate, January 31, 1918)

The locomotives of Utah Railway enroute from the builders were commandeered for service by USRA in the east. Union Pacific and Western Pacific, which had a locomotive surplus, would furnish power to help Utah Railway with its needs. (News-Advocate, January 31, 1918)

United States Smelting, Refining and Mining Company moved the incorporation of its company from Maine to Utah. Filing fee of $18,758 was one of the largest yet in the state of Utah. (Coal Index: The Sun, January 25, 1918, p.3)

A. B. Apperson resigned as manager of United States Fuel Company. (News-Advocate, February 7, 1918)

The coal properties of United States Fuel were working five days per week. Black hawk produced 3,343 tons, a record for Utah, on one day in mid February 1918. (Coal Index: The Sun, February 22, 1918, p.1)

American Fuel Company was under new management. Output was 600 tons per day. The name was to be changed from Neslen to Hanson. (Coal Index: The Sun, March 22, 1918, p.6)

Wattis spur completed in mid April 1918. The mine will ship 200 tons per day. (Coal Index: The Sun, April 5, 1918, p.6)

Coal industry now under federal control, as of April 5, 1918. (Coal Index: The Sun, April 5, 1918)

Moroni Heiner took over Apperson's position as manager of United States Fuel. Heiner was formerly the second vice president of United States Fuel. (News-Advocate, April 18, 1918)

Utah Railway was bringing about 4,000 tons of coal per day to Provo, using "two trains for each engine". (News-Advocate, May 2, 1918)

United States Fuel's Panther mine changed to Heiner. (Coal Index: The Sun, October 18, 1918, p.6)

The new Bull Hollow mine at Kenilworth was fully modern and was operated with electricity. (Coal Index: The Sun, November 29, 1918, p.1)

1919

Utah Coal and Coke Company incorporated in Nevada. Property lies four miles south of Sunnyside in Water Canyon. Four acres. Spur line to be built. (Coal Index: The Sun, September 26, 1919, p.6)

1920

1921

George A. Storrs organized the Gordon Creek Coal Company in May 1921. The mine was to be located about eight miles up Gordon Creek Canyon. (Coal Index: The Sun, May 27, 1921, p.5)

Sunnyside No. 2 closed on August 17, 1920 due to fire. Reopened in late August 1921. (Coal Index: The Sun, September 2, 1921, p.6)

Great Western Coal Company organized by George A. Storrs. Plans included a railroad up Gordon Creek Canyon. (Coal Index: The Sun, October 14, 1921, p.6)

1922

The Black Hawk mine was opened in 1910 by Ogden interests. (Coal Index: The Sun, February 24, 1922, p.8)

Frank N. Cameron, president of Liberty Fuel, named as new vice president and general manager of Utah Fuel. A. R. Baldwin was president of Utah Fuel, also president of Western Pacific Railroad. Cameron was replaced as president of Liberty Fuel by his brother-in-law, L. R. Weber. (Coal Index: The Sun, March 10, 1922, p.1)

Surveyors at work on new line in Pleasant Valley to clear valley for new dam. (Coal Index: The Sun, May 19, 1922, p.1)

Decision reached in Washington on wreck of Utah Railway trains in tunnel number 2 on August 23, 1922. The trains met head-on inside tunnel. The dispatcher was to blame for the accident. (Coal Index: The Sun, November 10, 1922, p.7)

MacLean mine near Rains leased to the Sweets, who also control the Standard. (Coal Index: The Sun, December 29, 1922, p.6)

1923

The ICC issued a certificate to the Utah Central to build thirty three miles, from Huntington Canyon to Healy Siding, ten miles south of Utah Railway Junction. (Coal Index: The Sun, March 9, 1923, p.3)

The property surrounding the coal mines was assessed. (Coal Index: The Sun, March 23, 1923, p.8)

United States Fuel started a dairy at Hiawatha to furnish fresh milk to residents of Hiawatha, Mohrland, and West Hiawatha. (Coal Index: The Sun, March 30, 1923, p.1)

The operation of the Columbia mine was about to begin. (Coal Index: The Sun, July 13, 1923, p.1)

First coal was shipped from the Columbia mine. 200 miners were working. (Coal Index: The Sun, September 14, 1923, p.1)

Forty Holstein cows arrived at the U. S. Fuel's dairy. (Coal Index: The Sun, October 26, 1923, p.1)

1924

Independent Coal and Coke finished a 1-1/2 mile outlet tunnel, said to be the longest in the west. (Coal Index: The Sun, February 1, 1924, p.8)

The coal mine at Rolapp (Cameron) was referred to as the Royal mine. (Coal Index: The Sun, February 15, 1924, p.1)

The new tunnel at Kenilworth No. 1 mine brought out 100 tons per hour. (Coal Index: The Sun, February 29, 1924, p.1)

Coal City in Gordon Creek originally to be called "Dempsey City" after potential investor Jack Dempsey. The name became Coal City after Dempsey decided not to invest. Adjacent coal mine was Great Western Coal Mines, on 1,600 acres. (Coal Index: The Sun, February 29, 1924, p.8)

Castle Gate mine explosion killed 180 men on March 8, 1924. (Coal Index: The Sun, March 14, 1924, p.1)

Casualties at Castle Gate were changed to 171 killed. (Coal Index: The Sun, March 21, 1924, p.1)

Construction began on moving the Pleasant Valley line for the dam. (Coal Index: The Sun, June 13, 1924, p.1)

Castle Gate No. 2 reopened, after the explosion of March 8, 1924. The mine was declared safe by the state mine inspector. (Coal Index: The Sun, July 25, 1924, p.1)

George A. Storrs indicted for mail fraud in soliciting investment in bonds for townsite on Gordon Creek. Storrs was president of Great Western Coal Mines. (Coal Index: The Sun, November 7, 1924, p.6)

1925

United States Fuel built a new preparation plant at Hiawatha to improve screening and preparation of coal. Cost was $200,000.00. (Coal Index: The Sun, February 27, 1925, p.8)

United States Fuel closed the Mohrland mine (King Mine No. 2) due to low demand. Utah coal mines were working at about forty percent of their capacity, usually about two days per week. (Coal Index: The Sun, March 6, 1925, p.6)

Clear Creek and Winter Quarters mines leased to the Littlejohn Brothers and Bishop T. J. Parmley to keep them open. (Coal Index: The Sun, March 20, 1925, p.1)

The D&RGW board of directors approved construction of 131 miles of line from Soldiers Summit to vernal. (Coal Index: The Sun, May 23, 1925, p.1)

Storrs was changed to Spring Canyon after permission was received from Washington. Population was 1,100 people. Spring Canyon Coal Company shipped 166,000 tons in 1924, an average of 1,860 tons per day. (Coal Index: The Sun, June 19, 1925, p.4)

The estimated cost of D&RGW's Vernal line was $6,195,500.00. (Coal Index: The Sun, July 10, 1925, p.2)

D&RGW awarded the contract to build a railroad in Salina Canyon to Utah Construction Company, "last Wednesday" (August 20, 1925). (Coal Index: The Sun, August 28, 1925, p.1)

The dispute presented before the ICC for the Salt Lake and Denver to build from Provo to Craig, Colorado was covered by the Wall Street Journal. (Coal Index: The Sun, September 25, 1925, p.2)

1926

Consumers Mutual contracted with Allen and Garcia of Chicago to build its tipple. The tipple was to serve two mines on the east fork of Gordon Creek Canyon. (Coal Index: The Sun, January 8, 1926, p.1)

The ICC denied the Salt Lake and Denver's application due to insufficient study. (Coal Index: The Sun, January 29, 1926, p.1)

Great Western Coal Company in bankruptcy. Mine was located at Coal City. The company was in bankruptcy during February 1926. (Coal Index: The Sun, February 26, 1926, p.8)

United States Fuel sued Lion Coal Company for encroachment. United States Fuel won an award of $173,004.00. (Coal Index: The Sun, April 30, 1926, p.1)

The Mohrland mine reopened after being closed for two years. (Coal Index: The Sun, September 10, 1926, p.4)

D&RG's new Kenilworth Branch shipped first coal "last Wednesday" (November 24, 1926). (Coal Index: The Sun, November 26, 1926, p.1)

George Storrs cleared of mail fraud charges. (Coal Index: The Sun, December 17, 1926, p.4)

Sweet mine in Gordon Creek Canyon began production in September 1926, producing 500 tons per day. (Coal Index: The Sun, December 31, 1926, p.2)

1927

1928

1929

1930

1931

1932

1933

Blue Blaze Coal Company at Consumers. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, January 26, 1933, p.1)

D&RGW announced the proposed abandonment of the Winter Quarters Branch. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, April 6, 1933, p.6)

Castle Gate No. 1 and 2 were to work five days per week until the end of February. Average daily output was 2,500 tons. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, November 30, 1933, p.8)

1934

The mine at Rolapp was referred to as the Royal Coal Company. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, June 7, 1934, p.2)

1935

F. A. Sweet resigned as National Coal Company president due to ill health. He was replaced by C. D. Craddock. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, January 17, 1935, p.10)

The ICC was conducting hearings about higher rates in the Northwest for Utah Coal compared to Wyoming coal. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, August 1, 1935)

1936

1937

Columbia mine declared "captive" due to it providing coal only to the company that owned it. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, May 27, 1937, p.8)

List of the nineteen mines that worked on Columbus Day in 1937. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, October 14, 1937, p.1)

1938

Blue Blaze Coal Company in receivership, mine closed, not likely to reopen. Mine located at Consumers. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, February 17, 1938, p.1)

Walker Bank sued Blue Blaze Coal Company for full amount of money due from trust indenture, $1,233,000 in bonds. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, March 24, 1938, p.13)

The improvements at Hiawatha were to be finished by September 1938. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, June 23, 1938, p.1)

1939

The Standard mine was closed in February 1939 due to non-payment of wages to miners. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, February 2, 1939, p.1)

Blue Blaze Coal Company sold at auction. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, August 3, 1939, p.1)

The Standard mine was reopened in September 1939 after the company was reorganized. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, August 24, 1939, p.1)

The Union Pacific mine was to be sold. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, September 14, 1939, p.1)

Standard Coal, Incorporated of Nevada bought the property of Standard Coal Company. The property was ordered sold by the federal court. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, November 9, 1939, p.8)

Standardville mine sold to satisfy the bondholders. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, November 16, 1939, p.15)

The fire burning at the Union Pacific mine for more than fifty years broke out. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, December 21, 1939, p.1)

1940

The fire at the Union Pacific mine was put out. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, January 11, 1940, p.1)

Utah Fuel planned to open its new $300,000.00 preparation plant at Castle Gate on February 24, 1940. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, February 15, 1940, p.1)

National Coal mine sold to Carl Nyman of Price in June 1940. Operations began in late September 1940. A new tipple was built. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, October 3, 1940, p.5)

The Mutual mine was referred to as the Maple Creek Coal Company. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, December 12, 1940, p.1)

On one day in early December 1940, eighty-six trucks, each with at least ten tons of coal, passed through Spanish Fork Canyon during a one hour and forty-five minute period. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, December 12, 1940, p.1)

1941

Sweet mine closed, in possession of Carbon County for non-payment of back taxes. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, March 27, 1941, p.5)

1942

Almost all of the output of the Sunnyside mine was to go to supply coking fuel for the pig iron plant in California to produce plate steel for the U. S. Navy. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, June 11, 1942, p.14)

D&RGW bought twelve new locomotives and 1,500 new gondola cars to support the 200 percent increase in coal traffic from Sunnyside to two Kaiser plants, one at Geneva and the other near San Bernardino, California. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, July 2, 1942, p.12)

Five hundred coke ovens were installed at Columbia between November 1942 and January 1943. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, November 26, 1942, p.11)

New Columbia mine shipped 400 tons per day. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, December 17, 1942, p.1)

1943

The many improvements at the Sunnyside mine include a new machine shop. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, March 11, 1943, p.14)

1944

The construction of the tipple at the Geneva mine was complete. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, January 27, 1944, p.2)

1945

McGowan Coal Company operator of Consumers No. 3 mine. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, March 1, 1945, p.9)

Reference made to Geneva North and Geneva South mines. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, June 21, 1945, p.10)

Utah Coal Producers ask that the output of the Geneva mine be restricted to the needs of the steel mill. Not all coal from the Geneva mine was suitable for coke. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, October 25, 1945, p.1)

The request of the Utah Coal producers to restrict the output of the Geneva mine was protested by the United Mine Workers union. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, November 1, 1945, p.1)

The mine at Rains was referred to as Utah-Carbon Coal Company. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, December 13, 1945, p.10)

1946

Sweet mine worked by Hudson Coal Company. Gordon Creek mine worked by Utah Coal Leasing Company. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, February 21, 1946, p.11)

Columbia mine producing 1,385 tons per day. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, March 21, 1946, p.13)

Geneva mine producing 3,000 tons per day. The mine was on standby due to complaints of private industry that they were competing with the U. S. government. Surplus coal was then sold to the U. S. Treasury for export. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, April 18, 1946, p.16)

King Mine 1 and 2 producing 4,000 tons per day, with 410 employees. (Coal Index: The Sun, May 2, 1946, p.13)

The Geneva mine was to be sold to United States Steel, who was to increase production. A history of Geneva steel given. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, June 20, 1946, p.3)

The fire burning at the Union Pacific mine had been burning for five years. Bernard Newren operated the mine for more than thirty years, and wanted to reopen the mine from a new opening. (Coal Index: Sun Advocate, August 29, 1946, p.13)

Carbon County Newspapers

Carbon County News (?-1915), included Castle Valley News, name changed to News Advocate

Castle Valley News (1895-?), consolidated with Carbon County News

Eastern Utah Advocate (1895-1915), editor and staff to Carbon County News, press equipment to The Sun [Eastern Utah Advocate not available for January to May 1912]

Eastern Utah Telegraph (1891-1895), sold to Castle Valley News, 1895

Helper Journal (1932-?)

Helper Times (1911-1932), name changed to Helper Journal

News Advocate (1915-1932), sold to The Sun

Sun Advocate (1932-?)

The Sun (1915-1932), name changed to Sun Advocate

Sources

 

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